OGT and Emory Genetics Laboratory develop new molecular arrays

Tuesday 11 March 2014
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Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has expanded its range of research-validated CytoSure Molecular Arrays to investigate DNA copy number variation (CNV) underlying a variety of genetic disorders. Designed and optimised in collaboration with experts at Emory Genetics Laboratory (EGL; Atlanta, USA), the arrays are the ideal complement to DNA sequencing, providing a particularly powerful tool for investigating the variety of aberrations underlying genetic disorders. Professor Madhuri Hegde, Professor of Human Genetics at Emory University School of Medicine, will discuss the design and application of these arrays at the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) meeting on Thursday 27 March 2014.

Comparative genomic hybridisation arrays (aCGH) are the gold-standard for CNV detection and the 60-mer oligonucleotide probes utilised by OGT’s aCGH platform have been shown to deliver superior CNV detection than alternative platforms. The expanded CytoSure Molecular Array portfolio now enables detection of CNV in genes associated with over 20 genetic disorders, including cardiovascular, inherited eye, intellectual disability and neuromuscular disorders, as well as a range of inherited cancers. In addition, genes covering each disorder can be combined to create bespoke custom arrays, or further customised by the addition of novel content to suit each individual research project.

For the easy extraction of meaningful results from aCGH data, all CytoSure Molecular Arrays are supplied with OGT’s class-leading CytoSure Interpret Software.

Utilising highly targeted, exon-focussed arrays has been shown to detect CNVs as small as 12 bp in size that were missed by targeted NGS.1 Whether used alone or alongside sequencing, CytoSure Molecular Arrays allow researchers to reliably investigate the role of CNV in a wide range of genetic disorders. 

Register for OGT’s ACMG workshop to hear Professor Madhuri Hegde discuss the design and implementation of CytoSure Molecular Arrays at Emory Genetics Laboratory. For more information on CytoSure Molecular Arrays, visit www.ogt.com/cytosure.

  1. Detection limit of intragenic deletions with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization. BMC Genetics, 2013, 14:116

For further information, please contact:

Oxford Gene Technology, Begbroke Science Park, Begbroke Hill, Woodstock Road, Begbroke, Oxfordshire, OX5 1PF, U.K.

T: +44 (0) 1865 856800 ; F: +44 (0) 1865 848684 ; E: contact@ogt.com ; W: www.ogt.com ; Twitter: @OxfordGeneTech

 

Notes for editors:

About Oxford Gene Technology

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) provides world-class genetics research solutions to leading clinical and academic research institutions. Founded by Professor Sir Edwin Southern, and with customers in over 60 countries worldwide, OGT has a strong reputation and increasing share in the large and growing genomic medicine market. The Company’s Cytocell®, CytoSure™ and Genefficiency™ range of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), microarray and next generation sequencing (NGS) products and services deliver high-quality genetic analysis, enabling accurate identification and confirmation of the causative variation underlying genetic disease.

For more information on the Company, please visit our website at www.ogt.com

CytoSure™ and Genefficiency™ NGS browser/report: For Research Use Only; Not for Use in Diagnostic Procedures

CytoSure: This product is provided under an agreement between Agilent Technologies, Inc., and OGT. The manufacture, use, sale or import of this product may be subject to one or more of U.S. patents, pending applications, and corresponding international equivalents, owned by Agilent Technologies, Inc. The purchaser has the non-transferable right to use and consume the product for RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT for DIAGNOSTICS PROCEDURES. It is not intended for use, and should not be used, for the diagnosis, prevention, monitoring, treatment or alleviation of any disease or condition, or for the investigation of any physiological process, in any identifiable human, or for any other medical purpose.